YOUR DAY – A Tweed Typewriter Short

It’s a story of “ever upward” when a seemingly simple one room collection of goods reveals itself as the magical lens into the day’s “who knows what ceiling.” With cinematography and editing by Ferdinand A. LeGrange, written and directed by Paul Camarata, and voiced by the tandem of Rose and her Nonni, “Your Day” is a plucky love note to the sunny side of life. As The Great Stan Lee would say, Excelsior!

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THE SHORTEST DAY OF THE YEAR – A Tweed Typewriter Short

The third week of December puts the squeeze on daylight. That doesn’t mean it’s all doom and gloom. Learn why in this Tweed Typewriter Production, which brings to life the story of the winter solstice. Turns out that from the shed to the sky, a little bit of sun can go a long way in making it a singular day on the calendar.

Written, illustrated and edited by Paul Camarata, featuring narration by Mr. Charles.

For more words and pictures like this check out the other Tweed Typewriter Shorts on this site, and:

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WHO’S YOUR COACH GREEN?

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED on LINKEDIN.COM, Nov. 14, 2022

Exactly one year ago today I read a tweet that contained a spark of a story, which I’m thrilled to now share in the short film linked below. It springs from the football world of one small town. But even if you’ve never been there, never met someone from Washingtonville, New York, chances are you know someplace like it. The fortunate among us certainly know a Coach Green, a Mrs. Gallivan, a Sugar Bear – the people in all walks who quietly change the world one moment, one student at a time.

What a difference a year, a person, even a Tweet can make. Hope you enjoy the story this one inspired, and that maybe it inspires you to reach out to YOUR Coach Green.

Thanks to all those in the last 365 who contributed to this project, starting with Scott Pioli. Without his public expression of love and gratitude for his teammates and coaches, this film would have never happened. Thanks to all my NFL Films teammates who brought The Ville to the the screen, particularly Director of Photography Dave Malek, Location Sound Mixer Mark Ricci and Archival Producer Mikayla Rhoda. Thanks Brian Connolly and his team at Washingtonville High School, as well as to all the ’81 Wizards. Forty-one autumns ago, your selfless commitment to each other created something that lives forever.

Finally – thanks to all MY Coach Greens, in particular David Doemel, at Christian Brothers Academy, Albany, who I thought of often during the production of this film. As a Teacher, Principal, Coach, Counselor, and Dad, Mr. Doemel has worked tirelessly for more years for more people than I could count. He’s a five-tool servant-leader, equally capable of communicating the necessary message through an example, a word, or a look. It’s now been decades(!) since I watched and experienced it firsthand, yet Mr. Doemel’s influence has only grown stronger and more relevant the further life’s journeys take me from those years. Sending much love, gratitude, and respect, Mr. Doemel, for everything you did to help me and so many others write our stories.

JOHNNY CORKFORBRAINS LOST HIS CUP OF TEA! 3.0 – A Tweed Typewriter Short

The migration of this Johnny Corkforbrains story continues – from its original form as a word doodle, to a hand drawn Steller Story, to here now as a short film. Includes my new adventures in sound design and music production – truly a homeMADE movie.

Better Late Than Never: THOUGHTS ON FRANK DEFORD

During a job interview with NFL Films near the end of my senior year of college, I sat across from the man who named the Dallas Cowboys “America’s Team.” Older, quieter, and more serious than the rest of the 4-person panel conducting the session, he spoke up only occasionally, and throughout, appeared generally unmoved by any thoughts I had to offer.

During one answer about something else entirely I happened to mention Sports Illustrated, a side-door he immediately threw open.

“Who’s your favorite Sports Illustrated writer?” he asked.

It was a completely subjective question from the senior guy in the room, someone whose thinking I could not possibly have prepared for, and yet who could on the merits of any one answer determine the fate of my application.

Frank Deford, I replied.

“Mmmm,” he nodded. “Deford is the greatest writer that magazine has ever had.”

Never mind that a court of law would have dismissed it as an opinion. In these chambers, the fact that mattered was my taste and the head magistrate’s were the same. It was enough to calm my racing heart in the moment; it was what came back to me first when Films called with a job offer a week later; and it was what I thought of immediately upon hearing recently that Deford had died.

“If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead and rotten,
either write something worth reading or do things worth the writing.”

Ben Franklin wrote it. Frank Deford merely embodied it — penning himself a permanent place in the history of American letters by both writing volumes worth reading and indisputably doing something worth the writing: inspiring others. They are many, I am one. Officially, since the day in 1999 when I read “The Ring Leader” and loved it with the pure, inexplicable certainty that only the best creators spark.

Despite the example of his writing and the cosmic assist he provided in that job interview, I never did make the appropriate effort to thank Frank. Not even given the opportunity a few years into my career, when he was one of my interview subjects the first day I ever directed a documentary film crew.  Be a pro, I thought.  Circuitous anecdotes in which a thesis of gratitude only might be clear to the listener, well, those are a tricky species. Better to try being a competent inquisitor than come off as a stammering ink-sniff.  So I stuck to the task at hand.

It was an air-ball with no do-over.  So let this be my penance.

Thank you, Mr. Deford.

I’m happy to say I’m still at NFL Films, the company your inspiration helped lead me to join. The week I marked my 15th work anniversary was the same week your pen went silent forever. Since then, countless lovely words have been spilled in your honor. But unless you, Frank, got out in front of the Reaper, filing the copy for a publication to be named later, I’m certain there’ll be no written tribute to you that’s quite worthy.

For its small part, my best assessment of your influence is to offer this: that whatever accolades every G.O.A.T. of Sports’ Future may ultimately compile, all their resumes will still possess the same hole: Born too late to be profiled by as great a writer as any magazine ever had.

FOR AN HOUR in New York in 2005, I conducted this interview of Frank Deford for the first long form documentary I ever worked on, “Rozelle: Building America’s Game.” On this day part of my job as director was to bring props in the event we got stuck shooting in an undesirably blank room. And so, my own typewriter, books, and portrait of my high school adorn the set behind one of my writing heroes.

ROLLING in NOLA: A Steller Story from Making a Movie in New Orleans

For the past six months I’ve had the great good fortune of working on a documentary film about a remarkable year in the life of the city of New Orleans. Here is a Steller Story photo journal behind the scenes of the production.

The film, titled “The Timeline: Rebirth in New Orleans”, tells the story of how after Hurricane Katrina, a great city, its football team the Saints, and their iconic stadium the Superdome were forced to respond to an unprecedented natural disaster.  It premieres on Wednesday, September 21 at 8pm/ET on NFL Network, and features new interviews with Saints quarterback Drew Brees, and former NFL safety and ALS advocate Steve Gleason.

A SON-OF-ALBANY STORY, CO-STARRING MY DAD

PROLOGUE – Following is a behind-the-scenes account of my recent short film on a fellow Son of Albany, Charles Leigh.  He made history as the first player known to sign an NFL contract directly out of high school, before becoming part of the Miami Dolphins Dynasty of the 1970s.  This summer I had the privilege of telling his story for NFL Films Presents.

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LOGUE – Below is the second part of the written story originally published on the NFL Films blog, “They Call it Pro Football.”  To see the piece there, where it includes a slideshow of production photos and a link to a Charles Leigh highlight video consisting of footage discovered during the making of the film, click here.

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EPILOGUE – During our July, 2015 shoot in my hometown, I brought my Dad to work.  Actually, I needed him to drive me to locations, so it’s probably more accurate to say that he brought me to work.  Either way, it all felt somewhat prophetic come fall when I learned the Leigh feature, previewed in the Albany Times-Union, would premiere as part of an episode titled “Fathers and Sons”.